TranscribeMe Answers

TranscribeMe Answers 2020

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Well, I wanted to

Well, I wanted to put the focus primarily on women’s health today because I hear that it’s something that you deal quite a lot with. And there’s certain issues that are crucial for women to get information about. A lot of women are concerned about weight loss and which type of diet is best for weight loss. I mean, you have high fat, high carb, high protein, paleo ketogenic, vegan, intermittent fasting, people are so confused these days, which is probably what the industry wants is that confusion. But I’m hoping you can bring some clarity to all this.

Well, I think the first thing is we have to get away from this idea that anything that works for a period of time for weight loss is a good idea. I just did a video clip, which will air next week on the new study that came out everybody’s all excited about and it compared a low fat and a low carb diet. They said they were the same. Well, they were both terrible diets and they were the same. They both resulted in not much weight loss. But when we get into this, anything that lose the causes weight loss is good. I made the point in this video. Well, I’ll tell you a couple things that cause weight loss, being in a refugee camp, you lose weight, cocaine addiction, all cocaine addicts are skinny people. And so nobody in their right mind would say let’s go live in a refugee camp or take up cocaine in order to lose weight. But when the only thing you’re concerned about is weight loss, and you lose track of the health benefits or detriments of what you’re signing up to do. I don’t like that at all. If you take a look at what is the diet that will cause people to lose weight safely. In other words, you’re not trading one problem for another.

. I know somebody who lost 100 pounds on a Paleo Diet bladder kidneys transferable. Wow, in a skinny person waiting for new kidneys. That’s that’s the one that works best is a diet based on whole plant foods. It’s low in fat and high in fiber. And it’s pretty easy to stick to feel big. It’s so hard. It’s not hard. You just have to learn some new tricks and tools and shopping and all that sort of thing but it’s easy to stick with. One of the things that gets around that is the detriment of all it’s a problem with some of these weight loss plans is the weighing measuring portion control point Keeping kind of thing and people say, you know, I can just eat anything I want so when you can eat anything you want within the realm of the foods that we eat on the side, because it is really hard to overeat lentils and rice how we’re trying to do it how many bowls at 14 grams of fiber per bowl of lentils and rice Can you eat? It’s not seven. So it’s somewhat sound limiting and you can just have out the food and people like eating I like eating I don’t like restriction. That’s the best way to do it.

Yeah, I totally agree with that. I mean, I’m, I’m limited in certain ways because I don’t and can’t eat processed sugars and sweeteners and oils because I get all into a tie right? Sometimes I don’t feel so lucky because I it’s like I can’t, you know, grab and go sometimes and go out to restaurants freely sometimes. But I have such a hard time gaining weight, which is actually really good. So I agree with you.

Can you can you talk about why women lose bone mineral density at a quicker rate than men and is there something they can do to slow that down?

No, and they shouldn’t A normal sign of aging. See women have higher peak moment density. And the reason is the demands of carrying a child and breastfeeding on the human skeleton are really, really high. So after, after menopause, not gonna have any more children, you start to lose bone mineral density, men lose it too, but they have a lower peak and they don’t lose it as rapidly. I tell people, you go have a test, and they tell you that you’re losing bone mineral density, which is a normal side of aging. And I assume that most people know their aging before they go have the stupid test. This is not a big revelation in the doctor’s office, oh my gosh, I’m getting older, I had no idea was abnormal bone loss, and you can develop osteoporosis and have weak bones. But the reason I brought up the The other issue is that I think it’s important to deal with somebody who really has thinning bones at an abnormal rate because they’re not healthy or they don’t exercise

True well It’s kind of like age-related muscle loss sarcopenia where you know people gradually you lose their muscle mass.

So was excavated

So was excavated between 1962 and 1972. The archaeologists that excavated it, Dr. Charles was there and his assistant George Kretzmann for California archaeologists. He had his Ph.D. from UCLA and he just happened to meet the owner of the land who was a famous artist. And he had exhibited at the Southwest museum where a doctor was there was working, after talking convinced was there to come up excavate site. And so with volunteers and students, he worked on it off and on seasonally, unfortunately, never wrote it up.

 I never got analyzed because he was a very busy archaeologist. He had an active career. But fortunately, the artifacts were preserved, and the collection ultimately was kept intact. And then it was donated to the Verde Valley archaeology center. One of the spectacular things as a result of analyzing the materials or the plant remains, having worked in the southwest for 40 years, most of the plant remains that I’ve been involved with are new things that you can barely identify and you have to bring specialists and to determine even what it is so the plant remains that we have at this site are so well preserved that sometimes I joke, my audiences that I just went down to the supermarket and picked it up for the show because they look like they could have been actually, you know, in your kitchen for a few days. There were a lot of wild plant products that they ate was a very abundant diet and you’re nuts, acorns, teapots, Acacia seeds, Juniper seats, Indian tea or Mormon tea and even wild grapes. So the Synolo at this rock shelter, and we assume others that were pot on it before archaeologists can excavate them.

We’re actually living pretty well in the Verde Valley. We also have a lot of a GAVI that was roasted both the basis which is would have been part of the heart, which is a very important part of the story, Native American diet today, and then also banana, yucca fruits. And so the fruits that look like little mini bananas that grow prevalent all over Arizona also were eaten and apparently are very tasty as well and we have the seeds, even from them, indicating that they were collecting them right after plan and then taking them back home and then roasting a slightly rose To the garbage. And what I think is really remarkable, we actually have three of us with our flowers on them. I mean, this is just hard to believe that we would find flowers that preserve some of you that were Boy Scouts or Girl Scouts remember making a fire the Indian way. And here we have the the toolkit for making fires. And you can see that some are well used, and some are not so well used. But clearly fire would have been important and they didn’t have a big slider.

So they had to create their, their own fires. And when I did some research on fire making, I was surprised to find that some new Americans were so good at lighting fires that most of them could light a fire in two minutes with with this stick that they would grow to get the spark with some finger and get a fire going. And then what was really remarkable were the read arrows. And what’s really interesting because I did a study of these arrows is that no two are like each one is unique, which is confusing to me because when you read the literature, they say that well, we think American Indians painted arrows so they know how Who zero belong to who? So if that’s the case, why do we have 40?

Something arrows that are all entirely different than and in fact, some of my informants tell me no, no, no, we know which arrow it is we don’t have to pay in it to tell whose arrow it is, it would be important to know which arrow because there’s several people are hunting, they want to know who actually shot the deer, you know because they get a larger portion. So there’s something to the identity hypothesis, but they’re beautiful designs. And we even have one of the arrows it still has one of its feathers on it and it’s a great horned owl feather again to have this kind of preservation is pretty unusual for central Arizona. And you can see here where they’re Seenu which is a ligament from probably a deer was used to attach the feather and then the upper part which is missing would have attached to here and this would have been one of the three fletchings that would have been present on this arrow and a big surprise for me when I studied the four shafts, the arrows are composite arrows so the shaft is made of read receive secure with probable pitch and also occasionally was sooner wrapping and that was in Split at the end to put your stone project off point

::TranscribeMe Answers 2020::

Before we

Before we really dive deep into the conversation, I just wanted to get your take, how do you define talent management? And what parts of HR does that usually entail?

I probably think about it a little bit differently. I like to think of it more in terms of processes, but that talent processes are really about finding people that have the right potential to perform or have the right capabilities and potential to deliver on whatever we need organizationally. I hate to say this, but it’s kind of like the raw material side developing. We’re making sure that we have the capacity there, the potential there, and then I think it’s your employee experience employee engagement and management processes that are responsible for sort of unlocking that potential and pointing it at the right thing. 

So in light of the digital transformation, what talent management trends are, are beginning to change right now.

One of the biggest things that does on my radar or that I think about a lot is that I think we need to start thinking differently about jobs as being like one job one person, instead of thinking of things sort of very linearly, and as like my job, my sandbox my silo, we’re starting to see things like agile and project based work environments that are disrupting how we think about the way things get done. And so rather than me having a job where I have a manager that puts me on this task, and I do the same task every day for 365 days a year, I might be assigned to three different projects at once. And then as one or two of those projects come off, I’m assigned to a different project. Some people call it kind of a portfolio career, project based career work, but I think those two things are really challenging how we should be thinking about talent and talent development because it’s not sort of one person, one job or one person, one set of talents. Like we can really piece the puzzle together in a different sort of way that I think feels better for people but also is better for the organization probably in terms of getting right talent to the right spot. 

I really like how you mentioned the disruption that technology has constantly in the workplace and even in talent management. Could you elaborate maybe a little bit more on exactly how has technology disrupted the way that work used to be done, there’s so many different things technology is making it so that work is more mobile, it’s more fluid, it’s less place dependent. So I think that has had a big impact on it. I think also just the ability to find and mobilize skills in a different way. So I’m a non entrepreneur and small business until I use a lot of freelance work to get services and I have been able to find some really amazing people to work with through workplaces like Fiverr or some of these other crowdsource workplaces or freelance marketplaces. I think because of that happening and people starting to think differently about how they can package and market and connect what they do well to opportunities. Those two things I think are really dynamically shifting. What’s happening around talent

With the employment rate right now remaining low and the skills gap continuing to be a hot topic this year. How are organizations leveraging technology to keep these positions filled?

I think that is a big challenge in the talent acquisition space. But some of the things that I’m seeing is I think that people are really having to rethink how they go to market in terms of engaging with potential talent building longer term relationships. I also think they’re starting to think differently about contingency plans around work and how do we engage and work with contractors and freelancers in a way that gives us more flexibility. I think there’s just a general increased focus around the experience and the relationship. It seems like those are thematically important and I think we’re starting to realize like it’s not just about having a good job that pays good money. We’ve got to be doing more than that to not only attract but to retain and build longer term relationships with with people whether it’s full time employees or contractors and freelancers

I really like how you mentioned the disruption that technology has constantly in the workplace and even in talent management. Could you elaborate maybe a little bit more on exactly how has technology disrupted the way that work used to be done, there’s so many different things technology is making it so that work is more mobile, it’s more fluid, it’s less place dependent. So I think that has had a big impact on it. I think also just the ability to find and mobilize skills in a different way. So I’m a non entrepreneur and small business until I use a lot of freelance work to get services and I have been able to find some really amazing people to work with through workplaces like Fiverr or some of these other crowdsource workplaces or freelance marketplaces. I think because of that happening and people starting to think differently about how they can package and market and connect what they do well to opportunities. Those two things I think are really dynamically shifting. What’s happening around talent

With the employment rate right now remaining low and the skills gap continuing to be a hot topic this year. How are organizations leveraging technology to keep these positions filled?

I think that is a big challenge in the talent acquisition space. But some of the things that I’m seeing is I think that people are really having to rethink how they go to market in terms of engaging with potential talent building longer term relationships. I also think they’re starting to think differently about contingency plans around work and how do we engage and work with contractors and freelancers in a way that gives us more flexibility. I think there’s just a general increased focus around the experience and the relationship. It seems like those are thematically important and I think we’re starting to realize like it’s not just about having a good job that pays good money. We’ve got to be doing more than that to not only attract but to retain and build longer term relationships with with people whether it’s full time employees or contractors and freelancers

Easy To

Easy to talk about jobs and Ron numbers. But when we talk about these ideas of anchors and community and history and transition, it takes on a different dimension. I’m curious if you can unpack a little bit some of these concepts, because I have a sense that they have a bit more nuanced and direction for you. But let’s start with just transition. What does that mean, in this context? When you’re talking about a community that may be deeply embedded in a particular geography and industry?

Yeah, that’s a great question. So just transition is a concept. It’s not a new concept. We’ve been talking about just transition in the economic development context for years. And essentially, what it is, is the question of how do you transition from an industry that has anchored and economy whether that’s manufacturing, agriculture, mining, how do you transition at a community when that industry goes under for some reason, and how do you do it in a way that’s just how do you do that in a way that actually respects workers and community and culture. 

So we’ve been talking about this for a long time. And I think it’s interesting that it’s now become such an important concept in the climate world, it’s really core to the issue of resilience because we need to think about transition not just in areas where we’re saying, we need to close down that coal plant, or we need to find alternatives to oil, I really have come to believe that climate change and climate risk is a macroeconomic trend, like globalization and automation, and you can’t look at it in isolation, you have to think about what is transition look like at a time where we have climate change impacts, where we do have globalization and the economy and where there’s massive automation of some of these same industries that we’ve been relying on for years to kind of give people jobs after transition. So I think we’re at a really critical moment to rethink this whole idea. 

I’d love if you could give us a little bit of color to where we’re talking about here. Where are some of the communities that you’re looking at, give us a thumbnail sketch of what their physical climate risks are and their transition and industry frameworks are what are we talking about? 

An obvious one that I’m certainly not the only person to talk about is Alaska. So Alaska is an interesting place because so much of its development has been on the back of the oil industry. The oil industry, in fact anchored Anchorage, and has really driven a huge amount of economic development air, and is very embedded in the culture and the economy. 

Alaska is also ground zero for a lot of severe climate impacts. And we’ve already started seeing that in terms of warmer winters, flooding, in some places, ice melt, sea level rise, there are communities that are already having to deal with actually having to move looking at relocation. That’s a very extreme example, where if we’re serious about climate change, and we have to do to avert it, we need to look at moving away from oil, the industry that anchors Alaska, and at the same time number of those communities are actually facing climate impacts today that are causing a complete upheaval with the economy. And so to me, Alaska is a really interesting example of how do we think about transition then place that’s been anchored by this industry also is in such the crosshairs of physical climate impacts. 

Excellent here is a great example. And I think I think that makes a lot of sense that you’ve actually brought up a couple of things that I want to further unpack a little bit. You’ve talked about justice, culture, identity place-based. Can you talk about the role of that cultural identity as a factor in this Confluence? Because it sounds like it’s a big one? 

I think it is. I mean, my sort of underlying theory is that these inherently base based industries ground culture in a different way, then kind of itinerant industries do. And one of the interesting distinctions, of course, really, between most of the clean energy economy actually, and that old, if you will enter the economy is that a mining and extraction based economy is place-based. One of the great things about wind solar resources, but if energy efficiency, is that there are things that we can do in many, many places, their job creators in a lot of places that have not had that before they’re distributed, people can own them. There’s all kinds of great things about

Everyone

Everyone watching this is in their comfort range, and that’s really what I want to focus on because that’s such a magnificent piece of information that’s so foreign to everyone because essentially there’s that not many people are over hundred years old. So in our entire conscious memory that’s been our experience. We have no reason to believe that exposure to these harsher conditions might be beneficial.

Yeah. well, you think about our species we crossed the Sahara. We colonized Europe crossed the Alps crossed the Himalayas across the Pacific and and really populated the entire planet with only a whisper of what any of us might. Consider modern technology then it comes the advent of the modern world. Where we have control over our environment through central heating through air conditioning through things like this. And that’s like maybe hundred and fifty years that we had that sort of total control to give us comfort and where change was constant in our prehistory.

Now it’s homeostatic it’s comfortable. It’s not moving. And all of those systems that we had to adapt to the environment are now latent. They’re not really doing anything. And it turns out that we actually need those variations. We evolved to have that change. And those changes sparked changes in our body. Like I mentioned vasoconstriction which is the squinching of your arteries to keep your core warm. Well, that would happen just all the time in general and that vasoconstriction is just the start of my examination. Like that’s just the most obvious most easy. But there’s a serious autoimmune impacts with this treatment for diabetes, obesity and all of these things that are important because we used to think that human health relied on diet and exercise. But what this book uncovered is that there’s actually a third pillar and that the third pillar is the environment and the environment you inhabit has a serious impact on your life. And if you ignore it, you’re not doing your biology any favors.

Yeah, I couldn’t agree more and it really is an underlooked or underappreciated element of health. I mean as you mentioned, the primary focus on your foods and exercise food being far more helpful. But and I’m not sure if how you categorize exposure to light which I think is part of the environment are actually a fourth pillar but I think that’s way up there with food food with respect if its impact on health. 

So what I wanted to focus on now is you reference the improvement in some of these other diseases like obesity and diabetes and one might be wondering how that occurs and the clear thing that virtually no one are very few people especially clinicians appreciate is that this cold exposure or cold thermogenesis induces bad or brown adipose tissue which is incredibly mitochondrial. Dense and can nourish the mitochondria. I mean they improve the mitochondrial function. So why don’t you share with us your journey towards that understanding and in practical application?

Sure. Well, the first challenge that any human has when they’re born is maintaining a constant body temperature the word you use with thermogenesis, which is right and as an adult, the way you heat yourself is through your circulatory action, your muscle movement, your digestive action, and these things sort of work together to maintain a body temperature about ninety-eight point six. 

Now for a baby when they’re born, they don’t have a developed muscular system. They don’t have a Dilip digestive system, their circulatory system isn’t that great and they’re really small which means they have a high surface area to mass ratio which means they lose heat very quickly which is why we put premature babies and incubators. But the babies do have one trick up their sleeve to survive, and it’s those rolls of baby fat also around their thorax. And along their shoulders, they have this brown adipose tissue or brown fat. And what its role is to suck white fat from their systems and burn it directly for heat energy. And it’s incredibly efficient. So if you have a healthy baby that’s just been born.

Great

Great. So could you just tell us a little more about what you do here at the BSU and what your position consists of.

Well, I arrived here at BSU in January of 2006 at that point I was an instructor and I came in and was focusing on crisis management and crisis communication negotiation because of my experiences as a negotiator and love of that and also interested in global hostage-taking became interested in kind of moving up and got a great opportunity to become the energy available side so I put in and eventually I was selected and since then I’ve been kind of reworking the BSU and expanding the programs typically we have been focused on violent crime and we were the ones that developed a profile in criminal vests kate of analysis and term victimology and serial killing and all that came through our national academy classes over the years back in the 70s and 80s and so what I wanted to do is unit chief and what I’m continuing to do is move moving forward and getting into areas like cyber and national security threats in addition to doing our our staple violent crime mission that we’ve always done.

Great.

so would you mind just describing the structure of the unit and the function of the various staff members you have here

Sure the behavioral science unit has been around since 1972 as part of the FBI’s training division and we are physical located in the basement area of the FBI Academy in Quantico, Virginia. We are one of a number of training units here at the FBI Academy. And what our main function is here is the Train our National Academy students that come in and the National Academy is kind of like a War College for a law enforcement it’s been in existence since about 1935 at the time that this Academy was formed or built in 1972 the National Academy program was moved over here and what that program involves is experienced law enforcement officers mid-level management types that compete to come to the FBI Academy for about eleven weeks

 and when they get here they choose whatever courses they want to take if it’s at a behavioral science they’ll come to our unit and take our courses if it’s a leadership they’ll go to the leadership units and there’s also forensics and communication and other areas that they can learn now with that training in addition to National Academy we also teach new agents training we teach the FBI Intel analysts and we take our courses and our blocks of instruction literally worldwide all over the world where we’ll get requests for training from everyone and now in addition to supporting our traditional law enforcement clients we also train the military the intel community and some of our international partners and that’s what we do that’s our bread and butter now along with the training we also do research and we also do consultations and our tag line are kind of the way we do business is that if we train we research it and if we train that we consult it and that’s an important model because the consults is are the things that a lot of times where were known for where a police officer will call us and he’ll, let’s say ask for interview strategies. Let’s say he’s working a gang matter a violent crime maybe aberrant behavior a weird sexual type crime and he’ll call and want help and he may only have one shot to interview the subject. And so we try our best to give him some idea of strategies and tactics to get the person to confess or at least make admissions based on the behavior.

With some

with somebody that has such a long term and long standing history of doing nautical archaeology, can you give us a little bit of background, how it got started and what your perspective on nautical archaeology was when you were first getting started on your career?

Well, nautical archaeology, like regular archaeology began with explorers who were seeking not only the past, but in some cases, pressure, or just a chance to see what was down there. In the 19th century, when diving was first invented, these guys ultimately, of course, would recover whatever they could from these wrecks. By 1900 sponge divers in the Mediterranean, we’re finding ancient Rex was statues, that type of find inspired a new generation when scuba was invented. But it wasn’t until 1960 that the first archaeologist actually put on a tank with the bottom and systematically excavated a shipwreck and that guy was George bath would go on to found the Institute of nautical archaeology and his dig at Cape Caledonia hundred 2900 year old shipwreck at a number of people initially saying what really can you do archaeology for water will keep proof not only that you could but did you could do it to the same standard is on land, and maritime 

::TranscribeMe Answers 2020::

underwater archaeology not only would be a force in years to come, but it would add the otherwise inaccessible 70% of the planet is covered by water to a catalog of available sites that people could study and learn from. For the first few decades, there were few find people were fascinated the idea that all archaeology would just be driven by plunder our settings to put on the shelf, right way to more scientific study. But scientific or underwater archaeology that adds to the history books really didn’t get going until bass did his work. And what has happened since then has been an exponential growth. And it progressed to the stage now there’s practically no place on the planet, no ocean, no see, that doesn’t have some form of archaeology going on beneath the water.

I guess one of the real interesting questions and and I’m sure you can sort of cast a certain light on this is when the early days of underwater archaeology, we’re just getting going? What kind of methodologies did they do? How did they get this started? Obviously, there’s this huge question of how long can you excavate? How can you set up early mapping grids underwater? How do you develop protocols for doing that sort of thing, it seems such an onerous challenging, it’s hard enough to do this above ground

will bear in mind initially, a lot of this work is in the very shallow end of the pool, 

people are working in depth of less than 100 feet, in some cases, Caledonia you’re getting below 100 feet. What has changed over the last two decades, and particularly in the last decade, has been a lot of this work is not done electronically in terms of mapping and documenting before execution. But from that, and from just the innovation set to not only archaeologists, but engineers and other talented folks stepping into the field. It moves forward, I think a key point to remember and that is that underwater archaeology, nautical archaeology is more than just the archaeologists. There’s a whole field of people that have worked through the years to make this happen, cooperating and working with other scientists, like oceanographers, geologists, geographers, marine biologists, and powerfully there’s a lot more that we’re doing now based on the new technology that is having us look but not touch. And we’re learning a great deal just by doing that, not having to excavate not cases, we will not ever be able to physically to walk on the decks of Titanic again. But wherever possible, even interacting with the windows of a submersible, you’re still there. And I think it’s that which adds to the order of exploration and discovery which helps inspire not only inquiry, but the next generation